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Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 11Focusing on Aspects and Experiences of Religion$
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Antony Polonsky

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9781874774051

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781874774051.001.0001

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The Synagogues of Łódź

The Synagogues of Łódź

Chapter:
(p.154) The Synagogues of Łódź
Source:
Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 11
Author(s):

Krzysztof Stefański

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781874774051.003.0011

This chapter describes the synagogues in Łódź. The first synagogue in Łódź was built in 1809, the year in which a separate municipal authority was created, the town having previously been under the control of Lutomierz. The synagogue was a small wooden structure with a shingle roof, reflecting the modest economic circumstances of the Jewish community. Łódź experienced industrial growth from the 1820s, and there was a substantial increase in its Jewish population. By the end of the 1850s, the ramshackle condition and limited space of the old synagogue on Wolborska Street forced the Jewish community to plan for a new brick building. The Progressive Jews also planned to build a new house of prayer in the 1860s. The chapter then details the construction of the Progressive synagogue. The turn of the century witnessed extensive synagogue construction in Łódź; it was linked to a significant increase in the Jewish population. One of the reasons for the increase was the many so-called ‘Lithuanian’ Jews who settled in Łódź. These Jews, who were fleeing from persecution and pogroms, came from the easternmost area of the former republic and from Russia. They, too, began to build their own house of prayer in the closing years of the nineteenth century.

Keywords:   synagogues, Łódź, Jewish community, Jewish population, Progressive Jews, Progressive synagogue, synagogue construction, Lithuanian Jews

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