Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Creating American Reform JudaismLife and Times of Isaac Mayer Wise$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sefton D. Temkin

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9781874774457

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781874774457.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 25 July 2021

David Einhorn

David Einhorn

Chapter:
6. David Einhorn
Source:
Creating American Reform Judaism
Author(s):

Sefton D. Temkin

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781874774457.003.0023

This chapter turns to Rabbi David Einhorn. Einhorn was ten years older than Wise. He received his Talmudic education at the yeshivah of Fürth, in his native Bavaria, and at the universities of Munich and Würzburg. Participation in the German rabbinic conferences of 1844–1846 marked him out as a reformer and made life in German congregations uncomfortable for him. To point to the contrast with opponents such as Einhorn on the one side and Isaac Leeser on the other is helpful to the understanding of Wise’s personality and policies. Wise’s constant hammering at the need for an American rabbinate and the naturalization of the Jew and Judaism in America must be seen in the light of the Einhorn influence; the significance of his constant travels to outlying congregations stands in contrast to his opponent’s aloofness. What they shared was a readiness for full-blooded conflict.

Keywords:   David Einhorn, American rabbinate, Judaism, American Judaism, naturalization, Isaac Lesser, German congregations

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.