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Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 13Focusing on the Holocaust and its Aftermath$
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Antony Polonsky and Antony Polonsky

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9781874774600

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781874774600.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 26 June 2022

Stereotypes of Polish–Jewish Relations after the War: The Special Commission of the Central Committee of Polish Jews

Stereotypes of Polish–Jewish Relations after the War: The Special Commission of the Central Committee of Polish Jews

Chapter:
(p.194) Stereotypes of Polish–Jewish Relations after the War: The Special Commission of the Central Committee of Polish Jews
Source:
Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 13
Author(s):

Jan Gross

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781874774600.003.0015

This chapter describes stereotypes of Polish–Jewish relations after the Second World War. Even though most Polish Jews were killed during the German occupation, the stereotype of Judaeo-communism survived the war. If anything, it was reinforced by a widespread consensus that Jews assisted the Soviets in the subjugation of the Polish Kresy in 1939–41. The establishment of the Lublin government in the aftermath of the war served to perpetuate this stereotype still further. Popular sentiment attributed a nefarious role to the Jews and portrayed them as particularly zealous collaborators with the security police serving the new regime. Was it indeed the case that the dominant post-war Jewish experience in Poland was imposing scientific socialism on reluctant fellow citizens and persecuting ethnic Poles? The chapter argues that the dominant Jewish experience in Poland after the Second World War was fear. It also considers the Special Commission (Komisja Specjalna) established by the Centralny Komitet Żydów w Polsce (Central Committee of Jews in Poland: CKŻP).

Keywords:   Polish–Jewish relations, Second World War, Polish Jews, German occupation, Judaeo-communism, Lublin government, Central Committee of Jews in Poland, socialism, CKŻP, post-war Jewish experience

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