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Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 15Focusing on Jewish Religious Life, 1500-1900$
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Antony Polonsky and Antony Polonsky

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9781874774716

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781874774716.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Printing the Talmud in Poland in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

Printing the Talmud in Poland in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

Chapter:
(p.59) Printing the Talmud in Poland in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
Source:
Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 15
Author(s):

Krzysztof Pilarczyk

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781874774716.003.0002

This chapter explores Jewish religious print culture in Poland during the second half of the sixteenth century and the first half of the seventeenth centuries. During this period, Jewish printers in Poland established their printing houses in Kraków and Lublin. Jews in the Polish diaspora in the second half of the sixteenth and the first half of the seventeenth century saw the development of Jewish typography as essential to the normal functioning of Jewish communities everywhere. The members of the communities needed books to study the Torah, and in particular they needed the Talmud — the fundamental work on which rabbinic Judaism is based. The printers in Kraków and Lublin in this period satisfied the needs of the Jewish book market in Poland to a considerable degree while also competing with foreign printers. Jewish typography in Poland, managed by a few families over two or three generations, could not equal that of Venetian printers or later of Dutch printers, who had a much greater influence on culture and economy and served many European communities. Nevertheless, printers in Poland played a significant role in printing the Talmud.

Keywords:   Jewish printing, Talmud, Kraków, Lublin, Jewish typography, Jewish book market, Jewish printers

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