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Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 16Focusing on Jewish Popular Culture and Its Afterlife$
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Michael C. Steinlauf and Antony Polonsky

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9781874774730

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781874774730.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Between Poland and Germany: Jewish Religious Practices in Illustrated Postcards of the Early Twentieth Century

Between Poland and Germany: Jewish Religious Practices in Illustrated Postcards of the Early Twentieth Century

Chapter:
(p.137) Between Poland and Germany: Jewish Religious Practices in Illustrated Postcards of the Early Twentieth Century
Source:
Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 16
Author(s):

Shalom Sabar

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781874774730.003.0009

This chapter assesses the production of Jewish postcards in the early twentieth century. The fact that the Jews in this period wanted to participate in the postcard phenomenon carries an important social message, and, as is implied in the common Hebrew term for the postcard at the time, mikhtav galui (open letter), this desire was clear for all to see. The printing and acquisition of postcards signified acceptance of and support for the public image portrayed upon them. They are therefore a mirror of the ideology and values of turn-of-the-century Jewish society as that society wished to present them. At the same time, the postcards contain valuable ethnographic information about the lives of Jews during those years. The production of Jewish postcards was concentrated in three centres: two in Europe (Germany and Poland) and one in the United States (primarily New York). Germany may be considered the birthplace of the Jewish illustrated postcard: the earliest examples known were produced there in the 1880s. The chapter then considers the portrayal of Jewish religious practices in the postcards.

Keywords:   Jewish postcards, mikhtav galui, public image, Jewish society, Jewish life, Germany, Poland, Jewish illustrated postcards, Jewish religious practices

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