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Broadening Jewish History$
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Todd M. Endelman

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781904113010

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781904113010.001.0001

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Jewish Self-Hatred in Germany and England

Jewish Self-Hatred in Germany and England

Chapter:
(p.115) Chapter Six Jewish Self-Hatred in Germany and England
Source:
Broadening Jewish History
Author(s):

Todd M. Endelman

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781904113010.003.0007

This chapter discusses the term 'Jewish self-hatred', which describes Jews who experienced their Jewishness as a cruel plight and echoed the antisemitic slogans of the day that invites controversy. It explains how Jewish self-hatred has been used more often to attack opponents than to understand them since its emergence in the twentieth century, most prominently as the title of Theodor Lessing's polemic Der jüdische Selbsthass in 1930. It also mentions writers Philip Roth and Isaac Rosenfeld from the late 1940s and 1950s who did not respect communal pieties and were frequently accused of self-hatred and betrayal of the Jewish people. The chapter looks at intracommunal debates in recent decades in which right-wing circles have invoked Jewish self-hatred to disparage liberals and radicals who support a two-state solution to the Palestinian–Israeli conflict. The chapter cites ultra-nationalist ministers in Israeli cabinets who have denounced Jewish officials in the Obama administration as self-hating Jews.

Keywords:   Jewish self-hatred, Jewishness, antisemitic slogans, Theodor Lessing, Palestinian–Israeli conflict

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