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Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 1Poles and Jews: Renewing the Dialogue$
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Antony Polonsky

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9781904113171

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781904113171.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Loyalty to the Crown or Polish Patriotism? The Metamorphoses of an Anti-Polish Story of the 1863 Insurrection

Loyalty to the Crown or Polish Patriotism? The Metamorphoses of an Anti-Polish Story of the 1863 Insurrection

Chapter:
(p.81) Loyalty to the Crown or Polish Patriotism? The Metamorphoses of an Anti-Polish Story of the 1863 Insurrection
Source:
Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 1
Author(s):

Israel Bartal

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781904113171.003.0008

This chapter assesses the 1863 Polish insurrection, which had significant echoes in the Jewish society of Eastern Europe. That community, dispersed throughout the diverse areas of the former Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, often found itself in a situation which recurred a number of times in 19th- and 20th-century Jewish history: between the hammer of the Empire and the anvil of the autochtonic nation aspiring for independence. Resolving the matter of which side to favour was often an urgent, concrete question. On the one hand, the Jews were faithful to a long tradition of loyalty to the Crown, a tradition which grew stronger in the decades preceding the Rebellion even in haskalah circles; on the other hand, the Polish nobility and broad strata in Eastern-European Jewish society had been closely associated for many generations, an association still very strong in the mid-19th century. Jewish memoirs offer many descriptions of the Jews' situation during the Polish uprisings against the Russian regime in 1831 and 1863. Those Jews who had drawn closer to Polish culture identified with the Polish objectives. The Polish side, however, demonstrated lack of faith in the Jews and oftentimes accused them of spying for the Russians.

Keywords:   1863 Polish insurrection, Eastern-European Jewish society, Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, Jewish history, Jews, Polish uprisings, Russian regime, Polish nobility

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