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Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 1Poles and Jews: Renewing the Dialogue$
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Antony Polonsky

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9781904113171

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781904113171.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 01 December 2021

Steven E. Aschheim. Brothers and Strangers. The East European Jew in German and German Jewish Consciousness, 1800-1923. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press. 1983. Pp. 331.

Steven E. Aschheim. Brothers and Strangers. The East European Jew in German and German Jewish Consciousness, 1800-1923. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press. 1983. Pp. 331.

Chapter:
Steven E. Aschheim. Brothers and Strangers. The East European Jew in German and German Jewish Consciousness, 1800-1923. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press. 1983. Pp. 331.
Source:
Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 1
Author(s):

Sergiusz Michalski

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781904113171.003.0040

This chapter investigates Steven E. Aschheim's Brothers and Strangers (1983). In the 19th century, German Jews made their great social, political, and cultural bid for a sort of assimilation. In becoming Prussian and German citizens and diehard patriots, they desperately tried to minimize or totally break off the already limited relations with the neighbouring Jewish world of Eastern Europe. Around 1850 and later, the term ‘Ostjude’ stood for an image of an uncivilized, superstitious Easterner totally alien to the German Jew. Only when the assimilationist process suffered its first serious setbacks did some doubts, affecting the validity of the stereotype, creep in. For certain Jewish circles, especially Jewish intellectuals drafted into the German eastern front armies during World War I, the Ostjude became the very image of a Jewish cultural hero. Aschheim's book discusses both the stereotypes and the ideological discourse which manifested itself in the relations between these two great Jewish populations.

Keywords:   Steven E. Aschheim, German Jews, assimilation, Jewish world, Eastern Europe, Ostjude, Jewish intellectuals, World War I, Jewish cultural hero, Jewish populations

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