Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Rose

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781906733643

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781906733643.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 05 August 2021

The Uncanny

The Uncanny

Chapter:
(p.89) The Uncanny
Source:
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre
Author(s):

James Rose

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781906733643.003.0006

This chapter studies the concept of ‘the uncanny’ in relation to The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974). Throughout The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, elements of the Gothic have made themselves clearly manifest: the haunted house, the monster, and sustained persecution. These tropes have provided contexts with which to address the film's content and have exposed potential readings of the text which, in the final analysis, concentrically draw themselves towards a greater concept — the uncanny. The concept and occurrences of the uncanny not only forms the background to the Gothic genre but functions as the very modus operandi of many Gothic texts. With such a concept dominating the Gothic, its application to The Texas Chain Saw can be used to not only consolidate the proposition that the film is itself a Gothic text but, more, to draw the prior readings together and unify them in an effort to formalise a clear reading of Tobe Hooper's film.

Keywords:   uncanny, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Gothic genre, Gothic texts, Tobe Hooper

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.