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The Texas Chain Saw Massacre$
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James Rose

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781906733643

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781906733643.001.0001

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Legacy

Legacy

Chapter:
(p.97) Legacy
Source:
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre
Author(s):

James Rose

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781906733643.003.0007

This chapter explores the legacy of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974). Without doubt, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre is one of the most enduring of films of the horror genre, having attained a highly respected status from both fan and academic audiences. Its power to frighten and shock is not, in any way, diminished by its increasing age, nor is any of its visceral or brutal imagery dated in comparison to contemporary horror cinema. Chain Saw has many enduring legacies, including the crew's experience of its notorious production, the financial debacle following its release, and its subsequent censorship and, in some cases, outright banning. While these all have their place in the growing mythos of Chain Saw, the film's sustained impact upon the horror genre is perhaps best typified in the sustained plight of Sally Hardesty, for in her experiences a new character type was potentially born — the ‘Final Girl’.

Keywords:   The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, horror genre, horror cinema, censorship, Final Girl

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