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Black Sunday$
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Martyn Conterio

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781906733834

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781906733834.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

Production and Reception

Production and Reception

Chapter:
(p.31) 3. Production and Reception
Source:
Black Sunday
Author(s):

Martyn Conterio

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781906733834.003.0004

This chapter analyses how Mario Bava's Black Sunday began production on 28 March at Scalera Film studios, which was considered an intense shoot that lasted six weeks and wrapped on 7 May. It describes 1960 as the 'annus mirabilis' for the industry, where the share of domestic box-office for Italian film reached 50 percent for the first time since the war. It also discusses Barbara Steele's foray into American cinema, which was a disaster and curtailed by her allegedly walking off set after a row with director Don Siegel, a few days into the making of the Elvis Presley vehicle, Flaming Star in 1960. The chapter describes marketing campaigns for Black Sunday that ramped up the promise of sex and violence. It demonstrates the American International Pictures' (AIP) liberal attitude to the cutting and shot removal of Black Sunday, which certainly nullified some of Bava's more graceful beats that faded to black during gory moments.

Keywords:   Mario Bava, Black Sunday, Scalera Film studios, annus mirabilis, Barbara Steele, Flaming Star, American International Pictures

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