Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Image of the Non-Jew in JudaismA Historical and Constructive Study of the Noahide Laws$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Novak

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781906764074

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781906764074.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Late Medieval Developments

Late Medieval Developments

Chapter:
(p.195) Chapter Twelve Late Medieval Developments
Source:
Image of the Non-Jew in Judaism
Author(s):

David Novak

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781906764074.003.0013

This chapter studies how, following Maimonides and Albo, several other prominent Jewish thinkers reflected on the role of Noahide law both within Judaism internally and in relation to gentiles externally. Perhaps the medieval thinker who expanded the concept of the Noahide to its greatest point was Menachem ha-Meiri. He states definitively that there are no idolaters today like the pagans of the ancient world. Non-Jews are bound by religion, and clearly function in the moral universe as Noahides. By accepting the universal moral law, one that is written into the very essence of being human, Christians have a point of ethical commonality with the people of revelation. The chapter then argues that Meiri revived the biblical institution of the ger toshav, though of course absent the political dimension. It also considers the work of two nineteenth-century, Italian-Jewish thinkers: Samuel David Luzzatto and Elijah Benamozegh. Benamozegh presents a novel approach to Noahide law. He is the first—and, to this point, only—important Jewish philosopher to deem the content of this law to form a separate religion, “Noahism,” a religion that Benamozegh judged distinct from Judaism's monotheistic rivals.

Keywords:   Jewish medieval thinkers, Noahide law, Judaism, Menachem ha-Meiri, non-Jews, universal moral law, ger toshav, Samuel David Luzzatto, Elijah Benamozegh, Noahism

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.