Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Woman's LifePauline Wengeroff and Memoirs of a Grandmother$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Shulamit Magnus

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781906764524

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781906764524.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

Hope

Hope

Chapter:
(p.131) Five Hope
Source:
A Woman's Life
Author(s):

Shulamit S. Magnus

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781906764524.003.0006

This chapter details how another youth arose during the era of the pogroms. Not the youth of some bygone, pre-modern time to which Pauline Wengeroff supposedly harked back but an ‘enlightened’ youth who nonetheless, in her words, had not gone ‘astray to the alien in that dark time’. Among them were many who found their way back to the Jewish people and who, under the influence of recent events, closed ranks. Indeed, as a reaction to antisemitism, ‘the Hovevei Zion (Lovers of Zion) society arose’. It is to this youth that Wengeroff says she relates — for the first time — the ‘dreadful event’ of her sons' conversion, something she had not previously shared even with her intimates. These are Wengeroff's grandchildren, for whom Memoirs of a Grandmother is written. It is clear from Memoirs, that Wengeroff was a Zionist. One effectively sees in her work the emergence of full-fledged political Zionism from traditional proto-Zionism. The chapter then assesses how Wengeroff was able to write and publish Memoirs. What made the difference for Wengeroff, who must be counted a stunning success story in the history of Jewish women's writing, and of Jewish literature altogether? The chapter also looks at how her memoirs were received by her metaphorical grandchildren.

Keywords:   Pauline Wengeroff, Memoirs of a Grandmother, antisemitism, Zionism, Jewish women's writing, Jewish literature, Jewish people

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.