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Regional Identities and Cultures of Medieval Jews$
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Javier Castaño, Talya Fishman, and Ephraim Kanarfogel

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781906764678

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781906764678.001.0001

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The Bifurcated Legacy of Rabbi Moses Hadarshan and the Rise of Peshat Exegesis in Medieval France

The Bifurcated Legacy of Rabbi Moses Hadarshan and the Rise of Peshat Exegesis in Medieval France

Chapter:
(p.73) Chapter Four The Bifurcated Legacy of Rabbi Moses Hadarshan and the Rise of Peshat Exegesis in Medieval France
Source:
Regional Identities and Cultures of Medieval Jews
Author(s):
Hananel Mack
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781906764678.003.0005

This chapter investigates plain-sense Bible interpretations as examples of peshat, which were produced by Jewish linguists of the Islamicate world who were familiar with developments in quranic exegesis, Arabic lexicography and grammar. It mentions R. Moses Hadarshan as the earliest known pashtan in non-Islamic Europe during eleventh-century Provence and has the moniker Hadarshan, which gives the impression that he was better known at one time for his homiletical interpretations of scripture. It also recounts how R. Moses became the pioneer of both peshat and derash (homiletical) exegesis on European soil. The chapter talks about R. Moses's sermonic material that surfaced in a thirteenth-century assemblage of rabbinic writings compiled by Christians. It considers the possibility that R. Moses's peshat teachings may have been indebted to the linguistic clarifications of Andalusian Jewish philologists, such as Jonah Ibn Janah.

Keywords:   Biblical interpretations, peshat, Islamicate world, R. Moses Hadarshan, pashtan, derash, homiletical exegesis

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