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Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 31Poland and Hungary: Jewish Realities Compared$
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François Guesnet, Howard Lupovitch, and Antony Polonsky

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781906764715

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781906764715.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Polish and Hungarian Jews: So Different, Yet So Interconnected

Polish and Hungarian Jews: So Different, Yet So Interconnected

An Interview with István Deák

Chapter:
Polish and Hungarian Jews: So Different, Yet So Interconnected
Source:
Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 31
Author(s):

Howard Lupovitch

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781906764715.003.0026

This chapter presents an interview with István Deák. Deák outlines several reasons why there have been many more students writing about Poland than Hungary, or certainly about Polish Jews than Hungarian Jews. First, the great majority of American Jews are of Polish, Lithuanian, or Russian origin; relatively few are from Hungary. Second, the tragedy of Polish Jewry is better known; therefore, when people talk about the Holocaust, they mean Poland, even though many were killed who were not Polish Jews. The Hungarian Holocaust became widely known later, only in the last few decades. Another reason is that Polish Jews were not as assimilated as many Hungarian Jews were. The Hungarian situation was very different, because the Hungarian Jews' relationship with the Hungarians was much more controversial, much more complicated, and so many Jews did not want to admit that most Hungarians had been antagonistic to them. For an assimilated Hungarian Jew, it was a very painful thing to talk about.

Keywords:   István Deák, Poland, Hungary, Polish Jews, Hungarian Jews, Holocaust, Hungarians, assimilation

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