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Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 32Jews and Music-Making in the Polish Lands$
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François Guesnet, Benjamin Matis, and Antony Polonsky

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781906764739

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781906764739.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 14 April 2021

A Chestnut, a Grape, and a Pack of Lions

A Chestnut, a Grape, and a Pack of Lions

A Shabbos in Płock with a Popular Synagogue Singer in the Early Nineteenth Century

Chapter:
A Chestnut, a Grape, and a Pack of Lions
Source:
Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 32
Author(s):

Daniel S. Katz

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781906764739.003.0002

This chapter examines the life of Solomon Weintraub, also known as Kashtan, who is considered the best documented of all cantors prior to Salomon Sulzer. It explains that the “chestnut” and “grape” represent two of the most famous cantors of the nineteenth century: a father with the nickname Kashtan, which means chestnut and his son, who acquired the family name Weintraub, which means grape. It also confirms that “a pack of lions” refers to a couple of zealous but undisciplined meshorerim and a not especially accomplished local cantor. The chapter recounts how Solomon became famous through his appearances as a touring synagogue singer in communities from Riga to Budapest. It mentions how Solomon's son, Hirsch Weintraub, succeeded him as cantor in Dubno after his death.

Keywords:   Solomon Weintraub, Kashtan, grape, meshorerim, Hirsch Weintraub, cantor

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