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Macbeth$
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Rebekah Owens

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781911325130

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781911325130.001.0001

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The Presentation of the Supernatural – ‘Strange things I have in head’

The Presentation of the Supernatural – ‘Strange things I have in head’

Chapter:
(p.43) Chapter 3: The Presentation of the Supernatural – ‘Strange things I have in head’
Source:
Macbeth
Author(s):

Rebekah Owens

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781911325130.003.0004

This chapter focuses on how Roman Polanski exploited violence that can engender a physical response in the audience. It analyses how the feel of violence and emotional response it provokes provide one of the key ingredients that make Polanki's Macbeth a horror film. It also shows how Polanski very cleverly used the traditions of the Gothic horror film to raise an expectation of something supernatural is about to happen. The chapter describes the sight of alternative truths on signs of the supernatural that punctuated Macbeth as the audience are led by Polanski's cinematic sleight-of-hand into thinking the film is about a numinous force controlling the affairs of the humans. It points out Polanski's clever play on concessions to beliefs in the creation of an atmosphere of dreadful suspense.

Keywords:   Macbeth, Roman Polanski, Gothic horror film, supernatural, suspense, violence, emotional response

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