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Creepshow$
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Simon Brown

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781911325918

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781911325918.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 November 2021

Telegrams of Terror: The Making of Creepshow

Telegrams of Terror: The Making of Creepshow

Chapter:
(p.21) 1: Telegrams of Terror: The Making of Creepshow
Source:
Creepshow
Author(s):

Simon Brown

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781911325918.003.0002

This chapter details the making of George A. Romero's Creepshow (1982). The idea for Creepshow arose from a discussion between Stephen King, Romero, and Romero's producer Richard P. Rubenstein that took place in Maine in the summer of 1979. The three men had met to come up with a concept for a film which would, they hoped, be sufficiently successful to attract investors to their proposed adaptation of The Stand. While King wrestled with turning The Stand into a viable length for a theatrical feature, the challenge for Romero and Rubenstein was to find the money. The decision was therefore made to collaborate on a medium-budget picture that would be a big enough hit to calm investors' fears and raise the necessary capital for The Stand. It was King who suggested the alternative concept of tying the film into EC horror comics of the 1950s, and who also came up with the name, Creepshow, at which point the idea of using different formats drifted away.

Keywords:   George A. Romero, Creepshow, Stephen King, Richard P. Rubenstein, The Stand, EC horror comics

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