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Printed Musical Propaganda in Early Modern England$
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Joseph Arthur Mann

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781949979237

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781949979237.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Music as Propaganda for the Church of England after the Toleration Act

Music as Propaganda for the Church of England after the Toleration Act

Chapter:
(p.185) Chapter 4 Music as Propaganda for the Church of England after the Toleration Act
Source:
Printed Musical Propaganda in Early Modern England
Author(s):

Joseph Arthur Mann

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781949979237.003.0005

The passage of the Toleration Act meant religious freedom for non-Anglican Protestants but signaled a fundamental shift in the position of the Church of England in English society. Prior, the Church of England benefited from a government-backed monopoly on legal religious practice in England. The loss of these legal inducements meant that the Church of England had to compete equally, for the first time, in a marketplace of religious ideas. Chapter four exposes how the Church of England responded to this change with pro-music pamphlets advertising the joyful nature of the Anglican service in contrast to the austere practices of other Protestant denominations. It argues that while nonconformists wrote massive treatises arguing fine theological points about music in divine worship, Anglicans produced pamphlets that were addressed to the average reader in terms they could understand. It also connects these pro-music pamphlets to other accessible works written by Anglican propagandists that promote the Church of England in this new marketplace of ideas. Overall, the chapter reveals the previously-unknown propaganda functions of these Anglican music pamphlets and reveals that they were part of a larger, equally unknown, pro-Anglican propaganda campaign that directly responded to the results of the Toleration Act.

Keywords:   Toleration Act, Church of England, propaganda, Glorious Revolution, sermons, St. Cecilia’s Day, Baptist, accessible, publication, pamphlets

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