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Children of Men$
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Dan Dinello

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781999334024

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781999334024.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 23 May 2022

Conclusion: State of Emergency

Conclusion: State of Emergency

Chapter:
(p.123) 7. Conclusion: State of Emergency
Source:
Children of Men
Author(s):

Dan Dinello

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781999334024.003.0007

This chapter reviews Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men as a radical film that centralizes criticism of racism, xenophobia, white nationalism, and corporate technology. It examines how Children of Men subverts the conservative politics of the global capitalist entertainment industry by co-opting and castigating the system that produced it. It also points out how Children of Men does not derive its politics from its production context, but rather from the values it urges through its story and style. The chapter discusses Alfonso Cuarón's exploitation of mainstream mechanisms of the multinational entertainment machine by acceding to some mass audience expectations. It analyses the political importance and human value of Cuarón's artistry that is fortified through the vision of Albert Camus and his conception of fascism.

Keywords:   Alfonso Cuarón, Children of Men, racism, xenophobia, white nationalism, corporate technology, conservative politics

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