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American MythologiesEssays on Contemporary Literature$
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William Blazek and Michael K. Glenday

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780853237365

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846312540

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Native American Visions of Apocalypse: Prophecy and Protest in the Fiction of Leslie Marmon Silko and Gerald Vizenor1

Native American Visions of Apocalypse: Prophecy and Protest in the Fiction of Leslie Marmon Silko and Gerald Vizenor1

Chapter:
(p.157) Chapter 8 Native American Visions of Apocalypse: Prophecy and Protest in the Fiction of Leslie Marmon Silko and Gerald Vizenor1
Source:
American Mythologies
Author(s):

David Mogen

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780853237365.003.0009

This chapter focuses on the unexpectedly well-suited combination of Native American prophecy and science fiction in novels by Leslie Marmon Silko and Gerald Vizenor. Books such as The Almanac of the Dead, Bearheart, and Dead Voices express apocalyptic landscapes that illustrate the destructive political, social, and ecological costs of Western ideas of progress; but Silko and Vizenor also present an alternate vision of time and history which utilizes Native beliefs and traditions. Thus, within the political protest, ironic inversions, and social satire of these works, there is a transformative element not uncommon in Native American writing – one that allows apocalypse to be understood as change, and even for the possibility of imagined tribal utopias.

Keywords:   Native American prophecy, science fiction, apocalypse, Native American writing

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