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Breeding SupermanNietzsche, Race and Eugenics in Edwardian and Interwar Britain$
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Dan Stone

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780853239871

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846312694

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Race and Eugenics

Race and Eugenics

Chapter:
(p.94) Chapter Four Race and Eugenics
Source:
Breeding Superman
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780853239871.003.0005

Class and race have been intertwined with eugenics. The former is associated with the class-ridden societies of Britain and, to a lesser extent, the United States, while the latter is generally associated with the strict hereditarianism and its ‘perversion’ into blood and soil ideology in Germany's racially motivated genocide and Rassenhygiene. This chapter, which explores the role of race in British eugenics, shows that both class and race occupied a central place in the ideas and enquiries of British eugenicists, and argues that race-thinking was integral to their worldview. It also looks at how the same assumptions about race continued to inform research on race-mixing carried out by the Eugenics Society, whose members were more concerned with racial degeneration than with the threat to their middle-class way of life, after World War II. Finally, the chapter considers how eugenics is tied to the aristocratic and Tory revivalism of the Edwardian period.

Keywords:   Britain, class, race, eugenics, race-mixing, racial degeneration, Eugenics Society, revivalism

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