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Child Welfare and Social Action in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: International Perspectives$
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Jon Lawrence and Pat Starkey

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780853236764

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846312816

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

A Spirit of ‘Friendly Rivalry’? Voluntary Societies and the Formation of Post-War Child Welfare Legislation in Britain

A Spirit of ‘Friendly Rivalry’? Voluntary Societies and the Formation of Post-War Child Welfare Legislation in Britain

Chapter:
(p.234) 11 A Spirit of ‘Friendly Rivalry’? Voluntary Societies and the Formation of Post-War Child Welfare Legislation in Britain
Source:
Child Welfare and Social Action in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: International Perspectives
Author(s):

Julie Grier

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780853236764.003.0012

This chapter addresses the associations between the voluntary and the statutory sectors, and explores the complex pattern of links that developed between erstwhile child rescue societies and central and local government in the UK. It explores the large voluntary organisations, specifically the National Children's Homes and Barnardo's Girls' Village Home. The disruption of war resulted in a unique opportunity to explore children in a variety of settings. The report by Myra Curtis affirmed that adoption was the best way of supplying for children without families. The National Council of Associated Children's Homes (NCACH) became the body for communication and negotiation with central and local government. The 1948 Children Act demonstrated a novel link between the state and the voluntary sector. A study of the voluntary children's homes exhibited that a complex pattern of associations was developing between the voluntary agencies and central and local government.

Keywords:   child rescue societies, UK, National Children's Homes, Barnardo's Girls' Village, Myra Curtis, adoption, NCACH, 1948 Children Act, voluntary agencies, local government

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