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Irish, Catholic and ScouseThe History of the Liverpool-Irish, 1800-1940$
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John Belchem

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9781846311079

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846313363

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Faith and Fatherland: Ethno-Sectarian Collective Mutuality

Faith and Fatherland: Ethno-Sectarian Collective Mutuality

Chapter:
(p.95) 4 Faith and Fatherland: Ethno-Sectarian Collective Mutuality
Source:
Irish, Catholic and Scouse
Publisher:
Discontinued
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846313363.006

This chapter is concerned with the network of ethnic and sectarian friendly societies. It concentrates on three episodes in the development of Liverpool-Irish mutuality: the Ribbonite networks of the pre-Famine decades, the collecting burial societies of Fenian times and the friendly societies of the Home Rule period. Additionally, the chapter stresses the tensions between competing and sometimes complementary political, clerical and commercial formulations of Irishness as the basis for collective affiliation and mutual support. Ribbonism was strongest among migrants from Ulster and adjoining counties, but its sectarian mentality developed a wider sense of national identity and affiliation in pre-Famine Irish Liverpool in which Catholic and Irish became synonymous. The Irish National Foresters was the pre-eminent Irish organisation in Liverpool throughout the Home Rule period, providing the full range of properly audited friendly society benefits along with an ethnically accentuated open culture of display and parade.

Keywords:   Liverpool-Irish mutuality, Ribbonite networks, burial societies, Home Rule, Irishness, Ribbonism, Irish National Foresters

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