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Revisioning DurasFilm, Race, Sex$
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James S. Williams

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780853235460

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846313943

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Screening the Vampire: Notes on India Song and the Photographic Images of La Mer Écrite

Screening the Vampire: Notes on India Song and the Photographic Images of La Mer Écrite

Chapter:
(p.37) Chapter 2 Screening the Vampire: Notes on India Song and the Photographic Images of La Mer Écrite
Source:
Revisioning Duras
Author(s):

Gill Houghton

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780853235460.003.0003

This chapter, which offers a reading of Marguerite Duras's film India Song and the book of photographs La mer écrite, views India Song as a film consumed by its own narcissism and doomed like the vampire, and considers its first frame as mist, from which the vampire emerges directly. The film also produces specific co-ordinates in space that become both subject and object within the image. Darkness, a connecting thread in Duras's films, enshrouds India Song and seems to create a space for death and desire. On the other hand, La mer écrite implies clues, fragments, and parts of events with no fixed linear time, and is characterised by a temporality and open space of looking in both image and text. The chapter highlights the relation between narcissism and vampirism in India Song.

Keywords:   Marguerite Duras, India Song, La mer écrite, mist, narcissism, vampirism, time, space, darkness, photographs

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