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Revisioning DurasFilm, Race, Sex$
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James S. Williams

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780853235460

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846313943

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 22 October 2019

‘Like the French of France’: Immigration and Translation in the Later Novels of Marguerite Duras

‘Like the French of France’: Immigration and Translation in the Later Novels of Marguerite Duras

Chapter:
(p.127) Chapter 7 ‘Like the French of France’: Immigration and Translation in the Later Novels of Marguerite Duras
Source:
Revisioning Duras
Author(s):

Martin Crowley

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780853235460.003.0008

As a writer, Marguerite Duras developed a reputation as a staunch advocate of the rights of immigrant communities and other groups facing oppression due to race. This is evident in her constant alignments with racially marginalised groups, her denunciations of the Front National during the 1980s, and her vision of France as a country friendly to immigrants and immigration. This chapter examines the place of racial and linguistic identity in Duras's later novels. It first considers immigrant identity and textual solidarity with this identity before turning to the presence of a kind of linguistic pluralism in the texts, and then offers a close reading of the problematic of translation in the 1987 text Emily L..

Keywords:   Marguerite Duras, novels, immigrants, immigration, France, linguistic identity, translation, Emily L, race

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