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Social Theory after the Holocaust$
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Robert Fine and Charles Turner

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780853239659

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846314087

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Whither the Broken Middle? Rose and Fackenheim on Mourning, Modernity and the Holocaust

Whither the Broken Middle? Rose and Fackenheim on Mourning, Modernity and the Holocaust

Chapter:
(p.47) Chapter 3 Whither the Broken Middle? Rose and Fackenheim on Mourning, Modernity and the Holocaust
Source:
Social Theory after the Holocaust
Author(s):

Anthony Gorman

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780853239659.003.0004

This chapter depicts an evaluation of Gillian Rose's work and aims to defend Rose's argument that the tribulations of the Holocaust can be simultaneously be acknowledged and overcome using the Hegelian notion of phenomenology. The arguments it presents progress through four stages, the first of which outlines Rose's reading of the work of Bauman and Fackenheim, which shows her understanding of how the Holocaust is received. The second stage displays the basis of Rose's understanding using her analysis of Hegelian-Marxist analysis of modernity, while the third uses the latter part of her writing to impair her early claims that the Holocaust can be understood and mourned. The last stage explains that Rose's claims can be better defended using a weak theological philosophy of history. Ultimately, the argument concludes with a call for a better comprehension of the Holocaust.

Keywords:   broken middle, mourning, modernity, Hegelian, Marxist, theological philosophy

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