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War, Government and Power in Late Medieval France$
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Christopher Allmand

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780853236955

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846314421

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‘Decayed Feudalism’ and ‘Royal Clienteles’: Royal Office and Magnate Service in the Fifteenth Century1

‘Decayed Feudalism’ and ‘Royal Clienteles’: Royal Office and Magnate Service in the Fifteenth Century1

Chapter:
(p.175) 10 ‘Decayed Feudalism’ and ‘Royal Clienteles’: Royal Office and Magnate Service in the Fifteenth Century1
Source:
War, Government and Power in Late Medieval France
Author(s):

Gareth Prosser

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780853236955.003.0010

In 1964, Peter Lewis noted how the patrons of France during the later medieval period needed service, support, and following just like those in England. There is evidence that royal government resorted to clientage to articulate and energise the crown's formal structures while ensuring that the dynamic of politics generally came from below. This chapter examines how power was distributed and exercised in Normandy in the period after the English were expelled from the duchy in 1450. Patronage was created as part of the royal army system that emerged in the 1440s but would change substantially over time. The patronage system allowed the locality (the ‘periphery’) to contribute to the formulation of royal policy at the ‘centre’.

Keywords:   Peter Lewis, clientage, patronage, France, England, centre, politics, power, Normandy

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