Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
War, Government and Power in Late Medieval France$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher Allmand

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780853236955

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846314421

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 May 2020

‘Centre’, ‘Power’ and ‘Periphery’ in Late Medieval French Historiography: Some Reflections

‘Centre’, ‘Power’ and ‘Periphery’ in Late Medieval French Historiography: Some Reflections

Chapter:
(p.124) 8 ‘Centre’, ‘Power’ and ‘Periphery’ in Late Medieval French Historiography: Some Reflections
Source:
War, Government and Power in Late Medieval France
Author(s):

Kathleen Daly

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780853236955.003.0008

This chapter examines the relationship between the ‘centre’ and the ‘periphery’ in fifteenth-century France. It looks at the king's working relationship with those parts that made up his kingdom and discusses two themes underlying Peter Lewis's insights: historiography in late medieval France; and the political relationships and ‘power distribution’ between the king and his subjects. Although the king represented national unity and identity, there were parts of France that demonstrated the centre's healthy sense of independence by asserting themselves in more discrete ways rather than challenging the royal authority directly. The chapter also considers some examples of historical literature written in fifteenth-century France by authors situated either at the ‘centre’ of power (the royal court) or in the household or entourages of great princes. These authors include Noël de Fribois, Mathieu Thomassin, Michel du Bernis, and Perceval de Cagny.

Keywords:   France, centre, periphery, power, king, historiography, Peter Lewis, historical literature, royal court, Mathieu Thomassin

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.