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Words and Music$
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J. G. Williamson

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780853236191

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846314445

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Rethinking the Relationship Between Words and Music for the Twentieth Century: The Strange Case of Erik Satie

Rethinking the Relationship Between Words and Music for the Twentieth Century: The Strange Case of Erik Satie

Chapter:
(p.161) 7 Rethinking the Relationship Between Words and Music for the Twentieth Century: The Strange Case of Erik Satie
Source:
Words and Music
Author(s):

Robert Orledge

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780853236191.003.0008

The iconoclastic composer Erik Satie (1866–1925) has been fascinated by the relationship between words, spoken or unspoken, and music. In some of his Rose+Croix pieces of the 1890s, Satie derived the musical form from literature. He wrote his first popular song, Je te veux, to words by his friend Henry Pacory in 1897 and began accompanying the pince-sans-rire cabaret artist Vincent Hyspa a year later. Satie also composed songs for Paulette Darty, known as ‘The Queen of the Slow Waltz’. This chapter examines Satie's compositions and his transition to surrealism, as well as the influence of Jean Cocteau in his life between 1915 and 1923.

Keywords:   Erik Satie, words, music, Rose+Croix, Henry Pacory, Je te veux, compositions, Vincent Hyspa, surrealism, Jean Cocteau

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