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Racism Postcolonialism Europe$
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Graham Huggan and Ian Law

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781846312199

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846315626

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

The Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy: racism and ‘cartoon work’ in the age of the World Wide Web

The Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy: racism and ‘cartoon work’ in the age of the World Wide Web

Chapter:
(p.148) Chapter 10 The Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy: racism and ‘cartoon work’ in the age of the World Wide Web
Source:
Racism Postcolonialism Europe
Author(s):

Katarzyna Murawska-Muthesius

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846312199.003.0010

In September 2005, the Jyllands-Posten, a Danish tabloid with a reputation for being critical of immigrants, published twelve images mocking the Prophet Muhammad. The cartoons immediately sparked an acrimonious debate worldwide that became known as the Danish cartoon war, the Muhammad cartoon controversy, the cartoon intifada, and the cartoon jihad. This chapter examines the conflict generated by the Danish cartoon war and argues that it was largely about media representation. It suggests that whether cartoons function as vehicles of racism or freedom depends on how their representational codes are manipulated. Despite the controversy's obvious real-world consequences, it was fought primarily on virtual battlegrounds, the greatest of which was the World Wide Web. Commentaries from Muslims around the world in general and from the Muslim minority in Denmark in particular underscore cartoons' global dimensions and enduringly self-critical potential, even as they continue to perpetuate western cultural racism.

Keywords:   Jyllands-Posten, Danish cartoon war, racism, Denmark, World Wide Web, Muslims, Prophet Muhammad, cartoons

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