Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Racism Postcolonialism Europe$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Graham Huggan and Ian Law

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781846312199

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846315626

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Racism, (neo-)colonialism and social justice: the struggle for the soul of the Romani movement in post-socialist Europe

Racism, (neo-)colonialism and social justice: the struggle for the soul of the Romani movement in post-socialist Europe

Chapter:
(p.50) Chapter 4 Racism, (neo-)colonialism and social justice: the struggle for the soul of the Romani movement in post-socialist Europe
Source:
Racism Postcolonialism Europe
Author(s):

Nidhi Trehan

Angéla Kóczé

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846312199.003.0004

This chapter examines the impact of institutionalised racism in Romania and elsewhere in eastern Europe, with an emphasis on the so-called ‘Gypsy problem’ whereby Romani peoples continue to be vilified as a criminal subculture across Europe. It argues that the discrimination against the Roma is a testament to the internal colonialism prevalent both around and within the geopolitical concept of ‘eastern Europe’, as well as an example of postcolonial racism in which Romani peoples become subject to new forms of economic dependency. The chapter also considers the diffuse forces of power and how they operate within the ‘Roma rights’ movement in order to explain the existence of racialised hierarchies and neo-colonial dynamics. It first provides an overview of attempts to assimilate Romani communities in central Europe since the era of the Habsburg Empire's dual monarchy and its ‘civilising mission’. The chapter then analyses (neo-)colonialism, east European ‘backwardness’, and Romani emancipation, the hegemony of human rights entrepreneurs and the rise of neo-liberal agendas, and Romani subalterity in the non-governmental organisations.

Keywords:   Romania, eastern Europe, racism, Gypsy problem, colonialism, Roma rights movement, Romani peoples, (neo-)colonialism, non-governmental organisations, human rights

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.