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Reconfiguring SlaveryWest African Trajectories$
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Benedetta Rossi

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781846311994

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846315640

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 07 December 2021

African American Psychologists, the Atlantic Slave Trade and Ghana: A History of the Present

African American Psychologists, the Atlantic Slave Trade and Ghana: A History of the Present

Chapter:
(p.45) 3 African American Psychologists, the Atlantic Slave Trade and Ghana: A History of the Present
Source:
Reconfiguring Slavery
Author(s):

Tom McCaskie

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846311994.003.0003

In his 2007 book The History of Africa: The Quest for Eternal Harmony, Molefi Kete Asante argues that the centuries-long impact of white European and latterly American interventions in Africa, including the Atlantic slave trade, have undermined African unity and violated the core Kemetic/Egyptian principle of Maat. He expresses gratitude to W. E. B. Du Bois and other forefathers of Afrocentrism as well as colleagues such as Wade Nobles, who founded the Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi) in 1968 along with other like-minded psychologists. This chapter presents a ‘history of the present’ by focusing on Ghana's ‘heritage of slavery’, and examines the implications of Afrocentric discourses of slavery in contemporary Ghana by focusing on the work of the ABPsi. It shows how discourses of ‘legacy’ and ‘heritage’ reflect the ideological positions of their authors, all of them African Americans, onto the past and then conjure this reconfigured ‘past’ to interpret present circumstances.

Keywords:   Molefi Kete Asante, Africa, slave trade, African Americans, psychologists, Wade Nobles, Ghana, slavery, history of slavery, Afrocentrism

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