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Shaping BeliefCulture, Politics, and Religion in Nineteenth-Century Writing$
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Victoria Morgan and Clare Williams

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9781846311369

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846315688

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 06 June 2020

Sacrificial Exchange and the Gothic Double in Melmoth the Wanderer and The Picture of Dorian Gray

Sacrificial Exchange and the Gothic Double in Melmoth the Wanderer and The Picture of Dorian Gray

Chapter:
(p.113) 7. Sacrificial Exchange and the Gothic Double in Melmoth the Wanderer and The Picture of Dorian Gray
Source:
Shaping Belief
Author(s):
Alison Milbank
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846315688.003.0007

This chapter examines the ways in which the aesthetic of the gothic double can function as an ultimately redemptive trope for the formation of a managed subjectivity in relation to anxieties about maintaining social order in the nineteenth century. It explores this idea through gothic literature, from Charles Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer to Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, and argues for the theological justification of the fissured self through the notion of sacrificial exchange. The chapter emphasises sacrifice and mutuality to critique nineteenth–century social relations.

Keywords:   Charles Maturin, Melmoth the Wanderer, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, gothic double, gothic literature, sacrificial exchange, social order, mutuality

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