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Shaping BeliefCulture, Politics, and Religion in Nineteenth-Century Writing$
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Victoria Morgan and Clare Williams

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9781846311369

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846315688

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Church Architecture, Tractarian Poetry and the Forms of Faith Kirstie Blair

Church Architecture, Tractarian Poetry and the Forms of Faith Kirstie Blair

Chapter:
(p.129) 8. Church Architecture, Tractarian Poetry and the Forms of Faith Kirstie Blair
Source:
Shaping Belief
Author(s):
Kirstie Blair
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846315688.003.0008

This chapter examines the formative relation between church architecture and religious poetry, particularly Tractarian poetry, in the 1830s and 1840s. It considers works from very different theological perspectives, including Isaac Williams' ‘The Cathedral’ and John Ruskin's Seven Lamps of Architecture, and argues that the ‘central space’ for religious feeling represented by church architecture and poetry played a major role in the shaping of belief. The chapter also looks at Coventry Patmore's writings which address the question of ‘the reconciliation of life and law’ in gothic.

Keywords:   Tractarian poetry, church architecture, religious poetry, belief, Isaac Williams, The Cathedral, John Ruskin, Seven Lamps of Architecture, Coventry Patmore, religious feeling

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