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French Studies in and for the Twenty-first Century$
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Philippe Lane and Michael Worton

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781846316555

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846316692

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Defining (or Redefining) Priorities in the Curriculum When the Good Times have Flown

Defining (or Redefining) Priorities in the Curriculum When the Good Times have Flown

Chapter:
(p.129) 11 Defining (or Redefining) Priorities in the Curriculum When the Good Times have Flown
Source:
French Studies in and for the Twenty-first Century
Author(s):

William Burgwinkle

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846316692.013

This chapter addresses the question of where French Studies should go in the current era of financial constraints and cut-backs. It argues that twenty-first-century French Studies must foreground their interdisciplinary nature and remain open to examining and questioning their own inclusiveness. One suggestion is for French departments to turn their attention back to the origins of French identity and the French state, and simultaneously look at how those definitions have both limited and expanded that sense of identity and inclusiveness. In other words, they should look at the evolution of the notion of ‘Frenchness’ and how it has developed over the past 1000 years before turning to the contemporary, postcolonial period in which notions of Frenchness sometimes depend more on language use than on nationalism and on places far beyond the reach of Paris and the French state.

Keywords:   French Studies, French language, language learning, French identity, Frenchness, inclusiveness, nationalism

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