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Postcolonial AsylumSeeking Sanctuary Before the Law$
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David Farrier

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781846314803

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317132

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Nothing Outside the Law

Nothing Outside the Law

Chapter:
(p.24) Chapter 1 Nothing Outside the Law
Source:
Postcolonial Asylum
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846317132.003

This chapter examines the sovereign claims, ‘there is no more outside’, and ‘there is nothing before the law’ and how they are enabled by sovereignty's occupation of boundary spaces and the operation of the ban as both kenomatic (that is, empty) and presuppositional. It looks at the use of extra-territorial processing by Australia and the United Kingdom, particularly the 2001 Tampa crisis. It also discusses the long history of colonial infrahumanity by analysing J. M. Coetzee's 1980 novel Waiting for the Barbarians as well as the fiction of Achille Mbembe and Paul Gilroy. The chapter explores Gilroy's prescription of diaspoetics as a response to (territorial, tribal) ‘campthinking’ and how it must take into account sovereignty's familiarity with interstitiality. Finally, it shows the convergence of asylum and (post)colonial concerns in settler Australia's insistence on the infrahumanity of its asylum seekers and indigenous peoples.

Keywords:   Australia, United Kingdom, asylum, infrahumanity, J. M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians, Achille Mbembe, Paul Gilroy, law, sovereignty

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