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The Black Legend of Prince Rupert's DogWitchcraft and Propaganda during the English Civil War$
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Mark Stoyle

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780859898591

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780859898591.001.0001

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Boy and the Historians

Boy and the Historians

Chapter:
(p.5) 1 Boy and the Historians
Source:
The Black Legend of Prince Rupert's Dog
Author(s):

Mark Stoyle

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780859898591.003.0002

This chapter considers some of the ways in which a glittering cavalcade of previous scholars – most notably, perhaps, Eliot Warburton, C.H. Firth, C. L’Estrange-Ewen, Veronica Wedgewood, and Kathleen Briggs - have approached the subject of Prince Rupert and his dog over the past 150 years. It moves on to consider recent representations of Boy in popular fiction and film - and demonstrates how the legend of the ‘witch-dog’ has grown more and more influential over time. The chapter concludes by noting that, although Boy is now regularly name-checked in even short general histories of the Civil War, we still know remarkably little about the dog's true history – and about why he became so notorious during the course of that conflict. [120 words]

Keywords:   Eliot Warburton, C.H. Firth, Evelyn Waugh, Tory Party, Veronica Wedgwood, Historiography*, Richard Harris, Ken Hughes, Simon Schama, Toy Poodle

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