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The Exploited SeasNew Directions for Marine Environmental History$
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Poul Holm, Tim D. Smith, and David J. Starkey

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780973007312

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780973007312.001.0001

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Testing Ecological Models: The Influence of Catch Rates on Settlement of Fishermen in Newfoundland, 1710-1833

Testing Ecological Models: The Influence of Catch Rates on Settlement of Fishermen in Newfoundland, 1710-1833

Chapter:
(p.13) Testing Ecological Models: The Influence of Catch Rates on Settlement of Fishermen in Newfoundland, 1710-18331
Source:
The Exploited Seas
Author(s):

Ransom A. Myers

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780973007312.003.0002

Ransom A. Myers studies three Newfoundland bays in order to test Scott Gordon’s maxim that renewable resource exploitation becomes unprofitable over time as new exploiters enter the system until profit margins reach zero. He uses a thorough collection of data for each bay, and determines that fishermen in Newfoundland settled if catch rates were greater than forty quintals of dried salt cod per annum, and emigrate if less. He presumes this population movement is reflected in the consistent catch rate in Newfoundland from the 1700s up until the 1990s collapse of the fishery.

Keywords:   Open Access Fisheries, Fishermen History, Fishermen Emigration, Renewable Resource Exploitation, Scott Gordon, Newfoundland Population, Newfoundland Fisheries, Bioeconomics

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