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Maritime Transport and MigrationThe Connections between Maritime and Migration Networks$
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Torsten Feys, Lewis R. Fischer, Stephane Hoste, and Stephen Vanfraechem

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780973893434

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780973893434.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 22 October 2019

The First Waves of Internationalization: A Comparison of Early Modern North Sea and Nineteenth-Century Transatlantic Labour Migrations

The First Waves of Internationalization: A Comparison of Early Modern North Sea and Nineteenth-Century Transatlantic Labour Migrations

Chapter:
(p.9) The First Waves of Internationalization: A Comparison of Early Modern North Sea and Nineteenth-Century Transatlantic Labour Migrations1
Source:
Maritime Transport and Migration
Author(s):

Jelle van Lottum

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780973893434.003.0002

This chapter argues that prior to the mass migration and globalisation of the nineteenth century, an earlier era of mass migration can be identified in the North Sea region between 1600 and 1950. It offers a quantitative analysis of Northwest Europe’s first major waves of internationalisation. It provides and analyses emigration rates and mobility patterns throughout the period, and seeks to determine the causes of increased migration within the region spanning Scotland, England, the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. It identifies two main waves of migration, occurring between 1550-1800 and 1850-1950 respectively. In exploring migration patterns, it defines four phases of movement: introductory, growth, saturation, and regression. Chain migration, industrialisation, the growth of urban populations, and the needs of the labour market are all considered, before concluding that the populace of the pre-industrialisation North Sea region was fairly mobile, linked to the supply of labour across the region, and statistically similar to the age of mass migration that followed later.

Keywords:   Globalisation, Internationalisation, Emigration Stock Rates, Chain Migration, Age of Mass Migration

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