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Trade, Migration and Urban Networks in Port Cities, c. 1640-1940$
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Adrian Jarvis and Robert Lee

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780973893489

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780973893489.001.0001

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Trade, Migration and Urban Networks, c. 1640-1940: An Introduction

Trade, Migration and Urban Networks, c. 1640-1940: An Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Trade, Migration and Urban Networks, c. 1640-1940: An Introduction1
Source:
Trade, Migration and Urban Networks in Port Cities, c. 1640-1940
Author(s):

Adrian Jarvis

Robert Lee

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780973893489.003.0001

This chapter introduces the major themes of the journal, namely, the way merchants built their businesses through trade networks that encompassed migration and port demographics. It outlines the activities of merchants and their approaches to risk reduction that subsequent chapters explore. In summary, these commercial risks included maritime insurance and ‘bottomry’; piracy; war; fire - a particular risk due to steam fire pump technology; port safety - including the threat of disease; and fraud. It outlines the various methods by which maritime merchants judged their business contacts trustworthy. Networks - religious, ethnic, personal, familial, were all ways in which a merchant could judge trustworthiness, though this system was not immune to failure, as further chapters demonstrate.

Keywords:   Bottomry, Maritime Insurance, Port Health, Port Networks, Merchant Networks

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