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Contradictory Woolf$
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Derek Ryan and Stella Bolaki

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780983533955

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780983533955.001.0001

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Ecology, Identity and Eschatology

Ecology, Identity and Eschatology

Crossing the Country and the City in Woolf

Chapter:
(p.166) Ecology, Identity and Eschatology
Source:
Contradictory Woolf
Author(s):

Sam Wiseman

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780983533955.003.0020

This chapter explores the crossings between nature and culture by focusing on the affinities and interconnections between the rural and urban environments in Virginia Woolf's work. It highlights the modernist cosmopolitan experience portrayed in Woolf's writing by discussing passages from Orlando, Between the Acts, and “Street Haunting: A London Adventure.” It considers Woolf's ideas about ecology and eschatology in relation to city and country, as well as her suggestion that the cosmopolitan, transient dynamics of modernity provoke a crisis of English national identity. It also examines Woolf's position about the crisis engendered by the artificial urban-rural dualism in connection to our relationship with the environment and nonhuman animals.

Keywords:   nature, culture, country, city, ecology, national identity, eschatology, modernity, nonhuman animals

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