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Contradictory Woolf$
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Derek Ryan and Stella Bolaki

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780983533955

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780983533955.001.0001

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“Am I a Snob?” Well, sort of

“Am I a Snob?” Well, sort of

Socialism, Advocacy, and Disgust in Woolf’s Economic Writing

Chapter:
(p.181) “Am I a Snob?” Well, sort of
Source:
Contradictory Woolf
Author(s):

Madelyn Detloff

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780983533955.003.0022

This chapter explores class and snobbery by focusing on the themes of socialism, advocacy, and disgust in Virginia Woolf's economic writing. It suggests that Woolf displays simultaneously class bias and an acute understanding of the links between ideology, education, and material wherewithal. It also agues that Woolf's “apparent contradictoriness” where class is concerned might be the result of an ethical distancing rather than a straightforward elitism. On the intellectual level, Woolf is often very precise about the links between money, power, and social value, which is evident in Three Guineas. In The Years, Woolf expresses disgust that seems to be precipitated by real or imagined encroachments of privacy.

Keywords:   class, snobbery, socialism, disgust, ideology, education, contradictoriness, elitism, advocacy

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