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Contradictory Woolf$
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Derek Ryan and Stella Bolaki

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780983533955

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780983533955.001.0001

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“A Brief Note in the Margin”

“A Brief Note in the Margin”

Virginia Woolf and Annotating

Chapter:
(p.209) “A Brief Note in the Margin”
Source:
Contradictory Woolf
Author(s):

Amanda Golden

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780983533955.003.0026

This chapter explores Virginia Woolf's practice and views of annotation by focusing on her essay “Writing in the Margin,” her annotations in her copy of Agamemnon, and a depiction of annotation in the first segment of The Years. In her Agamemnon notebook, Woolf demonstrates techniques that are integral to the history of annotating as an institutional practice. Her sense of the formality of translating as a genre may be in response to her academic training in Greek. The rest of this chapter considers Woolf's contradictory relationship to academia and the ways that academic institutions informed her responses to marginalia. It also examines Woolf's imagination of an annotation as if it were a reader's inscription on an author's flesh, as opposed to her later characterization of readers as reviewers.

Keywords:   annotation, Writing in the Margin, Agamemnon, The Years, academia, marginalia, reader, author

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