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Rough WatersAmerican Involvement with the Mediterranean in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries$
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Silvia Marzagalli, James R. Sofka, and John McCusker

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780986497346

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780986497346.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 June 2022

Rough Waters: American Involvement with the Mediterranean in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: An Introduction

Rough Waters: American Involvement with the Mediterranean in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: An Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Rough Waters: American Involvement with the Mediterranean in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: An Introduction1
Source:
Rough Waters
Author(s):

Silvia Marzagalli

James R. Sofka

John J. McCusker

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780986497346.003.0001

In his path-breaking study of the sixteenth-century Mediterranean world, Fernand Braudel identified the “invasion” by Atlantic ships and merchants as one of the major, long-lasting events in the history of the Mediterranean Sea in early modern times.2 According to Braudel, the arrival of English, Flemish and French Atlantic vessels and their captains began discretely in the early sixteenth century as a result of an increased Mediterranean demand for cheap transport services. Within a few decades, however, northern Europeans evolved from a complementary to a commanding position in the region. Atlantic shipping and trade came to dominate the most lucrative Mediterranean trades, and the Atlantic powers steadily imposed their rules and politics on Mediterranean countries, progressively subordinating the region to Atlantic interests. Their ...

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