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Interdisciplinary/Multidisciplinary Woolf$
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Ann Martin and Kathryn Holland

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780989082624

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780989082624.001.0001

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“Time has Whizzed back an inch or two on its reel”

“Time has Whizzed back an inch or two on its reel”

Relating Virginia Woolf and Emily Carr Through Vintage Postcards, Lily Briscoe, Mrs. Mcnab, and the Cinematic Time of to the Lighthouse.

Chapter:
(p.144) “Time has Whizzed back an inch or two on its reel”
Source:
Interdisciplinary/Multidisciplinary Woolf
Author(s):

Leslie Kathleen Hankins

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780989082624.003.0019

This chapter examines the historical possibilities of Emily Carr's presence in Cornwall during the Stephens' summer residences there and turns chronological coincidence into art. Generations of scholars have set the stage for bringing Virginia Woolf and Carr into a complex, at times a bit fantastical, relationship. Most recently, within modernist studies, Diane Gillespie brought attention to Carr and her writing on art in a section “The Gender of Modern/ist Painting” in Bonnie Kime Scott's Gender in Modernism. David Tovey, Marion Dell, and Marion Whybrow place Woolf and/or Carr in relation to communities of artists in St. Ives. With the society of St. Ives as basis, the chapter further considers the relationship between Woolf and Carr through vintage postcards, Lily Broscoe, Mrs. McNab, and the cinematic time of To the Lighthouse. It also discusses the postcard exchanges and cinematic visions of St. Ives as embodiments of artistic influence and the influence of art on academic research.

Keywords:   art, Emily Carr, Cornwall, St. Ives, vintage postcards, Lily Broscoe, cinematic time, To the Lighthouse, cinematic vision, artistic influence

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