Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Black Knowledges/Black StrugglesEssays in Critical Epistemology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jason R. Ambroise and Sabine Broeck

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381724

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381724.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Black Knowledges/Black Struggles: An Introduction

Black Knowledges/Black Struggles: An Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Black Knowledges/Black Struggles: An Introduction
Source:
Black Knowledges/Black Struggles
Author(s):

Jason R. Ambroise

Sabine Broeck

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381724.003.0001

This chapter discusses the book's main themes. This book is organized around the central but critically neglected theme of the role of knowledge and epistemic formations within the context of social movements for human emancipation. It specifically explores this thematic structure within the context of the localized and/or global struggles — both contemporary and historic — of the peoples of Black African and Afro-mixed descent against their forcibly and systemically-imposed subjugated and condemned status over the past five centuries within trans-Atlantic societies of the West. It argues that it is no coincidence that the self-assertions and emancipatory mobilizations by members of this population against their imposed subjugation/condemnation and dehumanization, logically also carried with them critiques of, challenges to, and/or counter-formulations against and beyond the same epistemic formations that coincided with and legitimized Black peoples' imposed abject-status within the various socio-human formations of Western modernity. These critiques, challenges, and/or counter-formulations point towards new ways of ‘knowing’, new ways of ‘being’ human, and/or new conceptions of ‘freedom’ and visions for human emancipation.

Keywords:   social movements, human emancipation, knowledge, epistemic formations, Black Africans, Afro-mixed descent

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.