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Science Fiction Double FeatureThe Science Fiction Film as Cult Text$
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J. P. Telotte and Gerald Duchovnay

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381830

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381830.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 29 May 2020

Whedon, Browncoats, and the Big Damn Narrative: The Unified Meta-Myth of Firefly and Serenity

Whedon, Browncoats, and the Big Damn Narrative: The Unified Meta-Myth of Firefly and Serenity

Chapter:
(p.98) 6. Whedon, Browncoats, and the Big Damn Narrative: The Unified Meta-Myth of Firefly and Serenity
Source:
Science Fiction Double Feature
Author(s):

Rhonda V. Wilcox

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381830.003.0007

Joss Whedon's failed television series Firefly ran for just three months: September 20, 2002 to December 20, 2002. Yet the fans and the series' makers refused to let it die. Organized expressions of fan interest, such as postcard campaigns and paid advertisements, encouraged the production of a DVD, which the fans carried to first place in sales. This success, and the ongoing determination of the makers and the fans (who call themselves ‘Browncoats’, after the resistance fighters in the series), helped propel the production of the 2005 film Serenity, which continues the story of the Firefly universe. This chapter discusses how the ‘Browncoat’ movement arising from Firefly and Serenity sought to continue the spirit of those texts, extending them beyond the film and television experience and effecting a cultural impact as a result of various sorts of fan activities. Through such behaviours, the Browncoats effectively pose a question of who actually owns both the text that speaks meaningfully to people as it finds a cult life, and the very media through which it manages to gain that life.

Keywords:   cult films, cult cinema, science fiction, sf genre, Joss Whedon, Browncoats, fans

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