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Tropics of HaitiRace and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865$
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Marlene L. Daut

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381847

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381847.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Baron de Vastey, Colonial Discourse, and the Global “Scientific” Sphere

Baron de Vastey, Colonial Discourse, and the Global “Scientific” Sphere

Chapter:
(p.110) Chapter Two Baron de Vastey, Colonial Discourse, and the Global “Scientific” Sphere
Source:
Tropics of Haiti
Author(s):

Marlene L. Daut

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381847.003.0003

What is under examination in this chapter is the way in which the works of the Haitian writer and statesman, Baron de Vastey, secretary to King Henry Christophe, challenge a wholly hostile pseudoscientific public sphere. This public sphere had used the two Haitis of the independence period as the culminating example of “monstrous hybridity.” By directly contesting the twin axes of colonial racism and colonial slavery, Vastey makes use of what the author calls a radical poetics and says that Vastey’s works makes him the direct progenitor of much of what we now call postcolonial criticism and theory.

Keywords:   Baron de Vastey, Christophe, Pétion, Monstrous Hybridity, Slavery, Race

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