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Branding the 'Beur' AuthorMinority Writing and the Media in France$
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Kathryn A. Kleppinger

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381960

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381960.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Sabri Louatah and the Qui fait la France? Collective

Sabri Louatah and the Qui fait la France? Collective

Literature and Politics since 2007

Chapter:
(p.235) Chapter VII Sabri Louatah and the Qui fait la France? Collective
Source:
Branding the 'Beur' Author
Author(s):

Kathryn A. Kleppinger

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381960.003.0007

The concluding chapter to the book compares two recent literary phenomena: a manifesto by a group of artists who sought for greater recognition of their artistic projects as well as the Les Sauvages trilogy by Sabri Louatah. The manifesto strongly proclaims the group’s frustrations with literary labelling and also condemns French society for on-going marginalization and discrimination. Their literary and political projects become confused, however, in that they often seem to contradict themselves by arguing for greater openness in readings of their work but then published a collection of short stories specifically about racism and discrimination in contemporary French society. Louatah’s trilogy, on the other hand, employs Arab characters but in a clearly fictionalized setting. His interviewers ask him much more about his writing process and artistic goals, and when they move toward social or political matters he politely tells them he has nothing to say. The presence of these two currents, the chapter argues, demonstrates that the descendants of North African immigrants to France have reached a point where many perspectives are possible and publicized by the mainstream media, which is perhaps the clearest sign of accomplishing their goals of being treated as insiders to French society.

Keywords:   Sabri Louatah, Karim Amellal, Mohamed Razane, Faïza Guène, Universalism

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